A memory of Jean Franco (1924-2022). by Gerardo Muñoz

Jean Franco, pioneer of Latin American Cultural Studies and witness to its Cold War gigantomachy, passed away a couple of weeks in December at age 98. She remained lively and curious even at the very end of her scholarly life, and for some of us that saw her in action she embodied the memory of the century. The photograph above is of Jean’s visit to Arcadio Díaz Quiñones graduate seminar in the fall of 2015 where she discussed some of the main arguments of her last book Cruel Modernity (Duke U Press, 2014), a cartography showing the definite closure of the Latin American insomnia for political modernity in light of its most oblique mutations: narcoviolence, the emergence of a dualist state structure, and new global economic forces that putted an end to the vigil of the revolutionary enterprise. I write “definite” purposely, since Jean’s own The Decline and Fall of the Lettered City (Harvard U Press, 2002) already hinted at a certain exhaustion (to borrow the strategic term of Alberto Moreiras also writing during these years), most definitely a thorough disillusion, in the sense deployed by Claudio Magris, of cultural substitution for the belated state-making modernization. The function of “culture” (and its hegemonic state apparatus) was always insufficient, dragging behind, or simply put, unintentionally laboring for the cunning of a project forever postponed in the sweatshop of the newest ideologue, or for the hidden interests of the “local” marketplace of moral academicism. All of this has come crashing down rather quickly even if the demand for culturalist janitorial or housekeeping services are still in demand to sustain the illusion sans reve et sans merci.

What always impressed me about Franco’s scholarship was her intellectual honesty to record, even if through an adjacent detours and academic finesse, the destitution of all the main categories of the Latin American modern wardrobe: developmentalism, state-civil society relations, the intellectual, cultural hegemony, revolutionary violence, the “rights revolution”, and the intra-national spatiality (rural/metropolitan divide). From now on it is hard to say that there is a “task of the critic”, if we are to understand the critic in the Kantian aspiration of sponsoring modern values and perceptiveness to an enthusiastic disposition (definitely optimistic towards action) to transforming the present. As a witness to the twilight of the Latin American modern epoch, Franco univocally resisted the inflationary, value-driven, demand for politicity and ‘more politics’. This is why her attitude remained at the threshold of any given effective political panaceas or half-baked illusions.

Does her biographical experience say anything to this particular inclination? It is difficult to say, although as a witness of the century Jean had lived through the coup in Guatemala in 1954, visited the Cuban Revolution during its most “intense years” of the sugar harvest and cutted cane in the fields (La Zafra de los Diez Millones), and followed with attentiveness the rise and transformation of the Southern Cone dictatorships in the 1980s coupled with the irreversible social transformation of neoliberalism in the 1990s signaling the effective end to regional integration in the face of planetary unity. All of this to say that I find it hard – at least leaving aside the many nuances – to see in Jean’s scholarly witness an enthusiasm for the Latin American Pink Tide, the communal state, or abstract regional historicizing that could finally bring about the moral universe of the national-popular state (as if said moral realization would be anything worthwhile, which we some of us seriously doubt). If Jon Beasley-Murray once said that John Beverley was the “Latin American unconscious”, I guess it is fair to claim that Jean Franco was an authentic Latin americanist realist; that is, someone that was up to task to see in the face of the tragic, the cruel, and the heinous as the proper elements of the interregnum. Or to better qualify this: she was a worldly realist, leaving aside utopias and its abstractions. At the end end of the day, Leninists are also realists, or at least claim to be so. What places Jean’s earthly realism apart from the Leninist realism is the subtraction from the seduction of Idealization, which even in the name of the “idea” (“the idea of communism”, say) or “immanent higher causes” must bear and render effective the logic of sacrifice at whatever cost, even the real sense of freedom if demanded by the party, the leader, or the community. This is why at the closure of Latin American modernizing enterprise communitarian arrangements, posthistorical subjects / identities, or grand-spaces that mimic the constitution of Earth are foul dishes for a final banquet. It is always convenient to refuse them.


Going back to my conversations with Franco at Princeton, and some exchanges a few months later in a cafe near Columbia University, for her there was remaining only the anomic geography of Santa Teresa in Bolaño’s 2666, a novel that charts the current ongoing planetary civil war in the wake of the crisis of modern principles of political authority. I can recall one remark from Jean during these exchanges: “¿Y quién pudiera mirar hacia otra parte?” This is the general contour of her witnessing: how not to look somewhere else? In other words, how not to look here and now, into the abyss that is no longer regional or national, Latin American or cultural specific, but rather proper to our own civilization? A civilization is, after all, nothing but the organization of a civis, which has now abdicated to both the metropolitan dominium, as well as the campo santo of sacrificed life at the hand of techno-administrative operators (the new praetorian guard) of a well lighted and fully integrated Earth.

There is no alternative modernity, decolonial state, or hegemonic culture that will not serve to the compensatory and sadistic interests of the cruel policing of death and value, as the only masters in town. We are in Santa Teresa as a species of energy extraction. Can reflection be courageous enough to look through and against them? This is the lasting and eternal question that Franco left for those who are willing to see. It does not take much, although it amounts to everything: mirar / to gaze – in an opening where human form is lacking and categories are wretched – is the the most contemplative of all human actions. Whatever we make of it, this practice now becomes the daring task of the coming scholar.

Tres apuntes sobre Neoliberalismo como teología política (NED Ediciones, 2020), de José Luis Villacañas. por Gerardo Muñoz

Neoliberalismo como teología política (NED Ediciones, 2020), de José Luis Villacañas, es el resultado de un esfuerzo de pensamiento histórico por sistematizar la ontología del presente. No está mal recordar que este ensayo no es una intervención puntual sobre el momento político y el mundo de la vida, sino que es otro ‘building block’ en el horizonte conceptual que Villacañas ha venido desplegando en libros como Res Publica (1999), Los latidos de la poli (2012), Teología Política Imperial (2016), o los más recientes volúmenes sobre modernidad y reforma. A nadie se le escapa que estamos ante un esfuerzo mayor en lengua castellana que busca la reinvención de nuevas formas de regeneración de estilos capaces de impulsar una ius reformandi para las sociedades occidentales. Neoliberalismo como teología política (NED Ediciones, 2020), nos ofrece una condensación, o bien, una especie de “aleph” de un cruce particular: una fenomenología de las formas históricas junto a la reflexion en torno a la normatividad propia del principio de realidad. En este apunte no deseo desglosar todos los movimientos del libro, sino más bien detenerme en tres momentos constitutivos del argumento central. Como aviso diré que los dos primeros problemas serán meramente descriptivo, mientras que en el tercero intentaré avanzar un suplemento que conecta con un problema del libro (la cuestión institucional), si bien no es tematizado directamente (la cuestión del derecho). 

Legitimidad. Los comienzos o beginnings son entradas a la época. Y no es menor que Villacañas opte por poner el dedo en la crisis de legitimidad que Jürgen Habermas ya entreveía en 1973. Esta crisis de legitimidad suponía un desequilibrio de los valores y de la autoridad entre gobernados y el sistema político en la fase de la subsunción real del capital. El mundo post-1968, anómico y atravesado por nuevas formas de partisanismo territorial, anunciaba no sólo el fin de la era del eón del estado como forma de contención soberana, sino más importante aun, un proyecto de reconfiguración del psiquismo que ponía en jaque a las formas y mediaciones entre estado y sociedad civil. Habermas detectó el problema, pero no vio una salida. Villacañas nos recuerda que el autor de Crisis de legitimación insistió en un suplemento de socialización compensatorio arraigado en la comunicación, la deliberación, y la razón; aunque, al hacerlo, obviaba que el nuevo capitalismo ilimitado operaba con pulsiones, energías, y “evidencias prereflexivas propias” (29). Habermas no alcanzó a ver, dado sus presupuestos de la sistematización total, algo que Hans Blumenberg sí podía recoger: la emergencia de la composición “técnica” previa a la socialización que, posteriormente, se presentaría como el campo fértil de la biopolítica. La nueva racionalidad biopolítica, ante la crisis civilizatoria de la legitimidad, ponía en marcha un nuevo “ordo” que operaba mediante la energía de libertad y goce. En este sentido, el neoliberalismo era un sobrevenido gubernamental tras la abdicación de la autoridad política moderna. El nuevo ‘discurso del capital’ suponía el ascenso de un nuevo amo que garantizaba libertad infinita a cambio de una subjetiva que coincidía con el rendimiento del Homo Economicus (fue también por estos años que el filósofo bordigista Jacques Camatte elaboró, dentro y contra el marxismo, la controvertida tesis de la antropormofización del capital) (72). Si la “Libertad” es el arcano de la nueva organización neoliberal como respuesta a la crisis de legitimidad, quedaría todavía por discutir hasta qué punto su realización histórica efectiva es consistente con los propios principios del liberalismo clásico (minimización del gobierno, y maximización de los intereses) que, como ha mostrado Eric Nelson, puede pensarse como un complexio oppositorum que reúne una doctrina palegiana (liberalismo clásico) con un ideal redistributivo (la teoría del estado social de Rawls) [1]. No es improbable que los subrogados de la nueva metástasis neoliberal fueran, más que un proceso de abdicación, la consecuencia directa de una teodicea propia del liberalismo. Tampoco hay que elevar el problema a la historia conceptual y sus estratificaciones. La concreción libidinal puede ser verificada en estos meses de confinamiento, puesto que el psiquismo ha logrado mantenerse dentro de los límites del medio del goce que no se reconoce en la pulsión de muerte. Esto muestra la absoluta debilidad de una ‘economía del actuar’ en el presente; al menos en los Estados Unidos donde las revueltas han sido, mayormente, episodios contenidos en la metrópoli. De ahí que el arcano de la ratio neoliberal no se limite a la policía, sino que su textura es la de un nuevo amo que unifica goce y voluntad. Esto ahora se ha intensificado con el dominio cibernético de Silicon Valley (Eric Schmidt). 

Teología política. Desde luego, hablar de arcano supone desplazar la mirada a la teología política. Una teología política que es siempre imperial en un sentido muy preciso: busca impugnar la cesura de la división de poderes mediante una reunificación de los tiempos del gobierno pastoral (85). La operación de Villacañas aquí es importante justamente por su inversión: el monoteísmo integral que Carl Schmitt veía en el complexio oppositorum de la Iglesia imperial (Eusebio), entonces fue realizable mediante el principio ilimitado de la razón neoliberal (91). Ciertamente, no podemos decir que Schmitt ignoraba esta deriva. Al final y al cabo, fue él también quien, en “Estado fuerte y economía sana” (1932), notó que, solo aislando la esfera económica del estado, podría activarse el orden concreto, y de esta manera salir de la crisis de legitimidad del poder constituyente. Pero Villacañas nos explica de que la astucia del neoliberalismo hoy va más allá, pues no se trata de un proceso “que no es económico” (92). Villacañas escribe en un momento importante del libro: “En el fondo, solo podemos comprender el neoliberalismo como la previsión de incorporar al viejo enemigo, la aspiración de superar ese resto liberal que impedía de facto, la gubernamental total, aunque ara ello la obediencia no se tuviera que entregar tal Estado” (92). ¿Dónde yace ahora la autoridad de obediencia? En la aspiración teológica-política de un gobierno fundado en el principio de omnes et singulatim. ¿Y no es esta la aspiración de toda hegemonía en tanto que traducción del imperium sobre la vida? Villacañas también pareciera admitirlo: “[el neoliberalismo] encarna la pretensión hegemónica de construir un régimen de verdad y de naturaleza que, como tal, puede presentar como portador de valor de universalidad” (96). Una Humanidad total y sin fisuras y carente de enemigos, como también supo elucidar el último Schmitt. Sobre este punto me gustaría avanzar la discusión con Villacañas. Una páginas después, y glosando al Foucault de los cursos sobre biopolítica, Villacañas recuerda que “donde hay verdad, el poder no está allí, y por lo tanto no hay hegemonía” (103). El dilema de este razonamiento es que, al menos en política, la hegemonía siempre se presenta justamente como una administración de un vacío cuya justificación de corte moral contribuye al proceso de neutralización o de objetivación de la aleturgia. Dada la crítica de Villacañas a la tecnificación de la política como “débil capacidad de producir verdad de las cadenas equivalencias” (en efecto, es la forma del dinero), tal vez podríamos decir que la formalización institucional capaz de producir reversibilidad y flexibilidad jamás puede tomarse como ‘hegemónica’. Esta operación de procedimientos de verdad en el diseño institucional “define ámbitos en los que es posible la variabilidad” (108). Yo mismo, en otras ocasiones, he asociado esta postura con una concepción de un tipo de constitucionalismo cuya optimización del conflicto es posible gracias a su diseño como “una pieza suelta” [2]. 

Un principio hegemónico fuerte – cerrado en la autoridad política de antemano en nombre de la ‘totalidad’ o en un formalismo integral – provocaría un asalto a la condición de deificatio, puesto que la matriz de ‘pueblo orgánico’ (o de administración de la contingencia) subordinaría “la experiencia sentida y vivida de aumento de potencia propia” en una catexis de líder-movimiento (150) [3]. En otras palabras, la deificatio, central en el pensamiento republicano institucional de Villacañas, no tiene vida en la articulación de la hegemonía política contemporánea. Esto Villacañas lo ve con lucidez me parece: “…entre neoliberalismo y populismo hay una relación que debe ser investigación con atención y cuidado” (198). Esta es la tensión que queda diagramada en su Populismo (2016) [4]. Y lo importante aquí no es la diferenciación ideológica, sino formal: todo populismo hegemónico es un atentado contra la potencia de la deificatio necesaria para la producción de un orden concreto dotado de legitimidad y abierto al conflicto. Si la ratio neoliberal es el terror interiorizado; pudiéramos decir que la hegemonía lo encubre en su mecanismo de persuasión política [5]. 

La abdicación del derecho concreto. Discutir el neoliberalismo desde los problemas de déficit de legitimidad, el ascenso de una teología política imperial, o la liturgia de una nueva encarnación subjetiva, remiten al problema del ordenamiento concreto. En este último punto quisiera acercarme a una zona que Villacañas no trata en su libro, pero que creo que complementa su discusión. O tal vez la complica. No paso por alto que la cuestión del orden jurídico ha sido objeto de reflexión de Villacañas; en particular, en su programática lectura de Carl Schmitt como último representante de ius publicum europeum después de la guerra [6]. Y las últimas páginas de Neoliberalismo como teología política (2020) también remiten directamente a este problema. Por ejemplo, Villacañas escribe el problema fundamental hoy es “como imaginar una constitución nueva que de lugar al conflicto su camino hacia la propia construcción” (233). Y desde luego, el problema de la “crisis epocal” también tiene su concreción en el derecho, porque coincide con la lenta erosión del positivismo hacia nuevas tendencias como el constitucionalismo, el interpretativismo, o más recientemente “constitucionalismo de bien común” (neotomismo). Desplegar una génesis de cómo el “liberalismo constitucional positivista” abdicó hacia la interpretación es una tarea que requeriría un libro por sí sola. Pero lo que me gustaría señalar aquí es que lo que quiero llamar la abdicación del derecho positivo a la racionalidad interpretativista o neo-constitucionalista (Dworkin o Sunstein) probablemente sea una consecuencia interna a la racionalidad jurídica. (Al menos en el derecho anglosajón, pero esto no es menor, puesto que el mundo anglosajón es el espacio epocal del Fordismo). En otras palabras, mirar hacia el derecho complica la crítica del armazón económico-político del neoliberalismo. O sea, puede haber crítica a la racionalidad neoliberal mientras que el ordenamiento jurídico en vigor queda intacto. El problema del abandono del positivismo jurídico es justamente el síntoma de la abdicación de la frontera entre derecho y política (o teoría del derecho, como ha explicado Andrés Rosler); de esta manera erosionando la institucionalidad como motor de la reversibilidad de la división de poderes. De la misma forma que el populismo hegemónico es débil en su concatenación de demandas equivalenciales; el interprentativismo jurídico es la intromisión de la moral que debilita la institucionalidad. En otras palabras, el interpretativismo es un freno que no permite trabajo institucional, pues ahora queda sometido a la tiranía de valores.  

Esta intuición ya la tenía el último Schmitt en La revolución legal mundial (1979), donde detecta cómo el fin de la política y la erosión de orden concreto (mixtura de positivismo con formalismo y decisionismo) terminaría en la conversión del Derecho en mera aplicación de legalidad [7]. Schmitt llegó a hablar de policía universal, que es mucho más siniestra que el cuerpo de custodios del estado, puesto que su poder yace en la arbitrariedad de la “interpretación en su mejor luz” dependiendo de la moral. Como ha señalado Jorge Dotti, esta nueva sutura jurídica introduce la guerra civil por otros ya que la “sed de justicia” convoca a una “lucha interpretativa abierta” [8]. Aunque a veces entendemos la excepción permanente como suspensión de derechos fundamentales o producción de homo sacer; lo que está en juego aquí es la excepcionalidad de la razón jurídica a tal punto que justifica la disolución de la legitimidad del estado. En esta empresa, como ha dicho un eminente constitucionalista progresista se trata de alcanzar: “un reconocimiento recíproco universal, lo que implica que comunidad política y común humanidad devienen términos coextensivos” [9]. Del lado de la aplicación formal del derecho, se pudiera decir que el “imperio de los jueces” (Dworkin) ha cedido su ‘hegemonía’ a una nueva racionalidad discrecional (y “cost-benefit” en su estela neoliberal) de técnicos, burócratas, agencias, y guardianes del aparato administrativo que ahora asume el principio de realidad, pero a cambio de prescindir de la mediación del polo concreto (pueblo o institución) [10].

Al final de Neoliberalismo como teología política (2020), Villacañas se pregunta por el vigor de las estructuras propias del mundo de la vida (230). Es realmente lo importante. Sin embargo, pareciera que las formas modernistas de la época Fordista (el produccionismo al que apostaba Gramsci, por ejemplo) ya no tiene nada que decir a uno ordenamiento jurídico caído a la racionalidad interpretativista. Al menos que entendamos en la definición de la política de Gramsci una “moral substantiva” donde no es posible el desacuerdo o la enemistad, porque lo fundamental sería unificar política y moral [11]. Pero esto también lo vio Schmitt: la superlegalidad o la irrupción de la moral en el derecho es índice de la disolución de la política, funcional a la ‘deconstrucción infinita’ del imperio y policial contra las formas de vidas [12]. Otro nombre para lo que Villacañas llama heterodoxias, en donde se jugaría la muy necesaria disyunción entre derecho, política, y moral. 

.

.

Notas 

1. Eric Nelson. The Theology of Liberalism: Polítical Philosophy and the Justice of God (Harvard U Press, 2019). 

2. Gerardo Muñoz. “Como una pieza suelta: lecciones del constitucionalismo administrativo de Adrian Vermeule”, 2020:  https://infrapolíticalreflections.org/2020/11/09/como-una-pieza-suelta-lecciones-del-constitucionalismo-administrativo-de-adrian-vermeule-por-gerardo-munoz/

3. Alberto Moreiras. “Sobre populismo y política. Hacia un populismo marrano”, Política Común, Vol.10, 2016: https://quod.lib.umich.edu/p/pc/12322227.0010.011/–sobre-populismo-y-política-hacia-un-populismo-marrano?keywords=…;rgn=main;view=fulltext  

4. Gerardo Muñoz. “Populismo y deriva republicana”, Libroensayo 2015: http://librosensayo.com/populismo-la-deriva-republicana/

4. Alberto Moreiras. “Hegemony and Kataplexis”, in Interregnum: Between Biopolitics and Posthegemony (Mimesis, 2020). 102-117. 

5. José Luis Villacañas. “Epimeteo cristiano: un elemento de autocrítica”, en Respuestas en Núremberg (Escolar y Mayo, 2016), 169-201. 

6. Carl Schmitt. La revolución legal mundial (Hydra, 2014). 34.

7. Jorge Dotti. “Incursus teológico-político”, en En las vetas del texto (La Cuarenta, 2011), 275-300.

8. Fernando Atria. “La verdad y lo político II”, en Neoliberalismo con rostro humano (Catalonia, 2013).

9. Adrian Vermeule. Law’s Abnegation: From Law’s Empire to the Administrative State (Harvard U Press, 2016). 

10. Gerardo Muñoz. “Politics as substantive morality: Notes on Gramsci’s Prison Writings VI”, 2020: https://infrapolíticalreflections.org/2020/12/05/politics-as-substantive-morality-notes-on-gramscis-prison-writings-vi-by-gerardo-munoz/

11. Tiqqun. “Glosa 57”, en Introduction to Civil War (Semiotext, 2010). 145.